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Get Out Movie Review

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What makes a great movie? Having something relatable or having it about something controversial? The amazing new movie Get Out has both. After a long notably devastating year for race relations, this movie has caused an understandable stir around the world.

Chris and his girlfriend Rose are heading to the suburbs where Rose’s parents live and where he’s going to meet them, without them knowing he’s black. From that premise, the director Jordan Peele developed a brilliantly horror comedy that pierces the sensitivity of American race relations.

A pre-credit scene sets up the looming violence, though nothing seems further from the warm embrace of Rose’s parents as they welcome Chris. Despite that, he stays puzzled by the weird and remote behavior from the family’s helpers, who are way too obedient, and when not busy with chores, move in some kind of daze, zombie like behavior. Although this was eventually revealed, this was very unsettling for Chris and to navigate out of an all white area full of people with potentially murderous behavior.

The jumps and scares are all up and down the script of this movie. It’s not until Chris wakes up to find himself officially held captive when he realizes that at this point, he has to do anything to make it out alive. And by eliminating all white people getting in his way, he does. Because of this, it’s clear this movie is viewed differently in black and white crowds. But as many have argued, maybe Get Out is payback for all expendable black characters that many past horror movies have given to us over the years. Only this time, the black person makes it too the closing credits.

This is an incredible first piece of work from new director Jordan Peele, making him the first African American to make an 100 million dollar debut. You might have heard of him from the show Key & Peele. He’s extremely funny, which makes it such a surprise that his first feature as a director is a horror. However, Peele explained that the psychological discipline of comedy has a lot in common with horror.

“The reason they [horror films] work, why they get primal, audible reactions from us is because they allow us to purge our own fears and discomforts in a safe environment it’s like therapy. You deal with deep issues that are uncomfortable with the hope there is a release,” said Peele.

This is one of very few horror movies to jump off of racial fears, and that’s one of the reasons why this movie has been getting more attention than others. “That to me is a world that hasn’t been explored. Specifically, the fears of being a black man today. The fears of being any person who feels like they’re a stranger in any environment that is foreign to them. It deals with a protagonist that I don’t see in horror movies,” Peele explained. “We have all been there before, where we have been somewhere and felt totally out of place and just wasn’t comfortable.”

 
Get Out is essentially about the feeling you get when you know you don’t belong somewhere; when you know you’re unwanted, or in this case, wanted too much. That’s a big reason why this movie is so relatable and why it’s enjoyed so much by its audience internationally. Peele infuses the age-old genre of knowing something is wrong around you but with a racial edge. What if meeting your girlfriend’s parents wasn’t just uncomfortable but actually life threatening?

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Get Out Movie Review