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The “Herstory” of Women’s History Month

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The “Herstory” of Women’s History Month

Mekaela DeGuire, Staff Writer

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As GCHS rolls through this second semester and spring starts to peek out from behind the clouds, many students are preparing for prom, starting their spring sports, or getting ready for graduation. However, some students have also celebrated an often forgotten event: Women’s History Month.

According to the National Women’s History Project, Women’s History Month began as Women’s History Week in 1978. The celebration was an initiative by the Education Task Force of the Sonoma County (California) Commission on the Status of Women to bring awareness to women’s history in Sonoma County schools. In February 1980, President Jimmy Carter issued a Presidential Proclamation, securing the week of March 8th, 1980 as National Women’s History Week. National Women’s History Week was declared once again in 1981 with a Congressional Resolution by Representatives Barbara Mikulski and Senator Orrin Hatch. Eventually, National Women’s History Weeks turned into National Women’s History months, and in 1987, March was set in stone as the official National Women’s History Month by Congress.

I asked some GCHS students who they were celebrating this Women’s History Month. Some wanted to recognize their family members; both sophomore Karina Brown and junior Gina French looked to their mothers as their favorite women, and senior Alisa Schreckenberg pointed to her grandmother.

GCHS senior Emma Vinson told me about some of her favorite historical women.“Margaret Hamilton; she wrote code for N.A.S.A.” Margaret Hamilton specifically wrote the code that was used on the Apollo missions that sent Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to the moon. She was also one of the world’s first software engineers; in fact, she coined the term.

Vinson also pointed to Marie Curie, a pioneer of radioactivity research and the first woman to win a nobel prize, and Susan B. Anthony, who famously campaigned for women’s right to vote.

Senior Natori Perdue told me Maya Angelou was who she was recognizing; the St. Louis native was a world famous poet and civil rights activist whose writings still inspire millions of people to this day.

I also asked resident social studies teacher Mrs. Burgess what she thought about Women’s History Month.

“I think anytime you can honor a select group of people, it always breeds learning and appreciation,” she said of the March celebration.

I asked Mrs. Burgess which woman she was celebrating during Women’s History Month. “Her name is Leslie,” she told me. “I grew up with her sons and she has been an inspiration to me. She is the woman I want to be.”

Some other important women in history include Miss Major Griffin-Gracy, a transgender rights activist, astronaut Sally Ride, the first American Woman to go to space, and Florence Nightingale, a statistician and the founder of modern nursing.

It is extremely important for students to remember and recognize the women who have made great achievements and have bettered our world. We as a society should not let ourselves disregard these accomplishments just because women were the ones to achieve them, and we should not stand by and let others do so. We need to show young women and girls that they should strive for anything that they want. The world is just as much in our grasp as anyone else.

About the Writer
Mekaela DeGuire, Staff Writer

Mekaela is a senior who usually has no idea what she's doing. Her hobbies include: Speech, learning about music, video games, watching cartoons, sleeping,...

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The “Herstory” of Women’s History Month